Callaway Goes Rogue in Search for Forgiveness

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By John Steinbreder of Global Golf Post

Rogue Regular
Callaway Rogue Driver

Callaway is not a company that likes to rest on its laurels. So rather than being satisfied with the success of last year’s Epic driver, the company is releasing a new one, called Rogue, that is designed to provide even more distance and forgiveness for many players.

The Rogue is available in three models, including a lower-spinning version (Rogue Sub Zero) and another that boasts a draw bias (Rogue Draw). The added distance from them all comes in large part from the employment of next-generation Jailbreak technology, which made its debut with Epic.

Rogue Sub Zero
Callaway Rogue Sub Zero Driver

With Rogue, company technicians have included new, hourglass-shaped titanium bars that are 25 percent lighter. But that weight reduction, they claim, has done done nothing to impair the ability of those bars to stiffen the crown and sole of the clubhead, which is what allows the face to take on more “impact load” and make possible the new X-Face VFT architecture, which promotes even faster ball speeds across the face.

At the same time, those engineers took advantage of weight savings they obtained through the use of their proprietary triaxial carbon composite to redistribute mass in the clubhead’s perimeter to elevate moment of inertia, which is what creates greater forgiveness and preserves distance and direction on off-center hits. And they enhanced the Speed Step technology that Callaway initially created with Boeing for Epic, redefining airflow and increase head speed.

Rogue Draw
Callaway Rogue Draw Driver

With its low-spin platform, the Sub Zero iteration of Rogue is geared towards better players, and the club features a pair of interchangeable weights (2 and 14 grams) in front and back of the sole so players can adjust the spin rate. As for the Rogue Draw, it uses a 5-gram screw in the sole near the heel and substantial weighting in that same area to pull the center of gravity inward, minimizing the sidespin that produces the sort of slice that plagues so many recreational golfers.

Republished with permission from Global Golf Post.

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